Frank Fiore – Novelist & Screenwriter

January 3, 2015

N-Word Or No N-Word? That is the Question

Filed under: Uncategorized — Frank Fiore @ 10:16 AM

Several years ago, I substitute taught in a high school that was in a prominently black neighborhood. The English class to teach that day happened to be a reading and discussion Of Mice and Men. As you may know, the ethnic slur of the ‘N’ word was used in the story. Reading the passage that the class had to discuss made me, being white, very uncomfortable at first, but after seeing the reaction from the class of mainly black students, I realized it was no big thing to them being it was part of the story. They were mature enough to realize that it was the story and not I reciting the word. But there are many incidents in school libraries and classroom where attempts at banning the ‘N’ word is being tried. Bowing to political correctness is threatening the original message of the Literature. Case in point.

By now, most people have heard about the new edition of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn being released next month. In it, the n-word has been slashed 219 times and replaced by “slave.” Discussions over this edition have been loud, particularly in literary and education circles. Erasing the n-word would, theoretically, free teachers to teach Huck Finn again. After all, year after year, the novel appears on the American Library Association’s list of most frequently challenged or banned books.

But students seem to understand better than the censors the need to keep in tact the original meaning of a great piece of literature like Huckleberry Finn, Of Mice and Men, and To Kill a Mockingbird. In the article, N-Word Or No N-Word? That is the Question, students are asked if they should read those books as is – or have the ‘N’ word cleansed like in the new version of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Their response was absolutely “No.” They understood the danger in fiddling with history. One student put it this way.

“…the n-word being replaced with slave, slave being replaced with servant, servant being replaced with assistant, assistant being replaced with secretary, and, before you know it, there were no slaves.”

Another said:

“Tainting Mark Twain’s words would increasingly soften and lighten the load that he is placing on our shoulders, until the shadow of slavery and the use of the ‘n-word’ is a tall tale.

The issue could be said no better. In my new novel MURRAN, the black street gangs use the ‘N’ word liberally. I wanted my story to be true to form, down and dirty and gritty – just like the streets.

December 29, 2014

Review My New 5 Star Novel MURRAN and Get 5 Star Rated THE ORACLE for FREE!

Filed under: MURRAN — Frank Fiore @ 11:52 AM
Tags: , , , ,

Review my new novel MURRAN is getting rave reviews. And if you buy a copy, I will send you THE ORACLE for your KINDLE – FREE.

  • First, purchase MURRAN.
  • Second, review the book on Amazon.
  • Third, send me an email pointing to your review at frank@frankfiore.com.
  • Fourth, I gift you an eBook copy of THE ORACLE

MURRAN synopsis:

Trey wanted to belong. He wanted respect. He wanted to be a man. With his father dead and his mother a drug addict, Trey and his sister Nichelle are forced to go live with their grandmother in Brooklyn. Surrounded by inner-city crime and conflicting ideologies, Trey seeks security and recognition by becoming a member of a small street crew. When he’s framed for a crime and facing prison, Trey flees to a Maasai village in Kenya with his English teacher and mentor, Mr. Jackson. though initially repulsed by the Maasai customs, Trey slowly comes to value their traditions and morals. As he goes through the Maasai warriors’ rite of passage becoming one of their own, he learns what Black African culture is truly about. Only after confronting lions, disapproving Maasai elders, and his own fears does Trey begin to understand that men are made and not born. Honest and unafraid, Murran is a tale of a young African-American teen coming of age amidst the pitfalls and threats of a 1980s Brooklyn. What he learns along the way could possibly lead his community toward a cultural revival.

ORACLE synopsis:

The ORACLE consists of a series of episodic short stories that combine the likes of Ray Bradbury’s the ILLUSTRATED MAN, Rod Serling’s the TWILIGHT ZONE and the short stories of JEFFREY ARCHER. The ORACLE consists of a series of short stories tied together by means of a background story – a story within a story (similar to Ray Bradbury’s “Illustrated Man”). And like the Jeffrey Archer and Twilight Zone stories, the Oracle short stories are written with surprise endings.

Such a  deal! Two 5 Star rated books for the price of ONE.

December 28, 2014

Strange predictions for the future from 1930

Filed under: Frank Remarks — Frank Fiore @ 10:40 AM
Tags: , , ,

Well, it’s new years. You know what that means. The scandal sheets lining up their predictions for the future.

But instead of looking towards the future from today, what about seeing what was predicted for today from someone from yesterday. Specifically, someone in 1930.

FE Smith with a terrier dog in the 1920s

Shortly before he died in 1930, former cabinet minister and leading lawyer FE Smith, a friend of Winston Churchill and one of the more outspoken British politicians of his age, wrote a book containing predictions of how the world would look in 100 years’ time. They covered science, lifestyles, politics and war.

So what did he say? How much of what he predicted turned out to be true?

December 25, 2014

Get My New Novel MURRAN for Free + $10.00 !!

Filed under: MURRAN — Frank Fiore @ 11:06 AM
Tags: , , ,

I’m offering the opportunity to get my new novel MURRAN for FREE – plus and extra $10.00

My new critically acclaimed novel MURRAN has been released. I invite you to consider purchasing it. If you do and if you write a review on Amazon – I’ll send you a $25 Amazon Gift Card.

It’s like getting MURRAN for FREE plus $10.00!!

Here is a synopsis of the story:

Trey wanted to belong. He wanted respect. He wanted to be a man.

With his father dead and his mother a drug addict, Trey and his sister Nichelle are forced to go live with their grandmother in Brooklyn. Surrounded by inner-city crime and conflicting ideologies, Trey seeks security and recognition by becoming a member of a small street crew.

When he’s framed for a crime and facing prison, Trey flees to a Maasai village in Kenya with his English teacher and mentor, Mr. Jackson. Though initially repulsed by the Maasai customs, Trey slowly comes to value their traditions and morals. As he goes through the Maasai warriors’ rite of passage becoming one of their own, he learns what Black African culture is truly about. Only after confronting lions, disapproving Maasai elders, and his own fears does Trey begin to understand that men are made and not born.

Honest and unafraid, Murran is a tale of a young African-American teen coming of age amidst the pitfalls and threats of 1980s Brooklyn. What he learns along the way could possibly lead his community toward a cultural revival.

Please consider purchasing MURRAN and if you write a review and post it on Amazon, I will send you a $25.00 Amazon gift card in consideration of your time.

  • First, purchase MURRAN.
  • Second, review the book on Amazon.
  • Third, send me an email pointing to your review at frank@frankfiore.com.
  • Fourth, I send you an Amazon $25 digital gift card.

You can view the online media kit, sample chapters, and reviews at: http://indigoriverpub.com/mediakit/murran

You can purchase MURRAN on Amazon at: http://tinyurl.com/ppa4g2k

I enjoyed writing MURRAN and I hope you enjoy reading it.

December 24, 2014

Yes, Christopher, there still is a Santa Claus

Filed under: Uncategorized — Frank Fiore @ 11:50 AM
Tags: , ,

The values of Christmas have been handed down by our culture from generation to generation and celebrates the birth of Jesus Christ and the values that he stood for. In it’s more modern form, Christmas is represented by Santa Claus. And as you know, Santa is considered the most beloved person of children all over the world. Many children believe in him. You did too. And I hope you still do. But, as you are about to enter your teen years, Christopher, you probably are having your doubts on whether Santa Clause exists.

There will be a time – soon in fact – when your peers will tell you that belief in such things as Santa Claus is ‘childish’ and not the ‘adult’ thing to do. But little do these ‘realists’ know that adults are merely children who owe money.

So you ask me, “Is there a Santa Claus, Dad?”

And I reply, “Yes, Christopher, there still is a Santa Claus and you need him now more than ever before” – it’s just that he’s harder to find as you grow older.

Santa Claus does exist – as surely as our hopes, our wishes and our dreams exist. He’s the embodiment of the values of family, home and community. Like Christmas Eve itself, he’s magic – not because there’s magic in the world but because children see the world as magic. He’s all that’s good, unselfish and generous in the world, and, in his own way, he is Christmas.

When you were young, you received from Santa the explicit gifts of Christmas – toys, candy, and the obligatory sweater. But you also received the implicit gifts of family, home and love. Will you continue to receive Santa’s gifts? Yes, you will.

But as you grow older, Christopher, you’ll have to work harder to get them. When you were younger, you had to work to be good. As you grow older you’ll have to work to create good. When you were younger, he found you. As you grow older you’ll have to work to find him.

The times we live in suggest logic, cynicism and distrust are the ‘values’ of survival these days and that the intangibles of love, faith and hope are fast disappearing from our communal landscape. But you’ll find that in the final analysis, those abstract intangibles are the only things worth having. But are they real? Ah, Christopher, there is nothing more real and abiding in this world. Hold strong the intangibles. Ignore the skeptics. These intangibles do serve a practical purpose.

How?

Those who no longer wish, no longer dream. And those who lose their dreams lose their hopes. And those who lose hope are easy to control. The freedom to live comes directly from the freedom to dream. And now, just as you have begun to internalize the values of your parents, you’ll have to internalize the values of Christmas. Your journey of self-discovery has just begun and the wonder, awe and magic of life will always be there if you see and not just look, if you feel and not just touch, if you listen and not just hear.

Yes, Christopher, Santa Claus is harder to find when you grow up. But he does exist.

Where, you ask?

As Tinkerbell said to Peter Pan, you’ll find him in between the time you are asleep and the time you are awake – the time when you can still remember your dreams.

December 22, 2014

It’s Come to This – How the Left Stole Christmas

Filed under: Uncategorized — Frank Fiore @ 6:07 PM
Tags: , , , ,

The Left has finally gone out of its mind. Nothing is sacred to these philistines. Now they are going after children’s belief in Santa Claus and the Virgin Mary.

The Leftist magazine Salon, wishes you a rapey Christmas. What’s that you ask? Well in keeping with their demeaning of women, Salon chose this week to offer two dyspeptic and nonsensical takes on religion, the most outrageous of which argues that one has to support rape in order to be Christian.

That’s correct. God raped the Virgin Mary.

Does Salon go out of its way to promote the scummiest writers they can find? This is Christmas for crying out loud! This is their version of holiday cheer?

But not to be outdone, the elitists at our vaulted universities go one better. Take away Santa Clause from children.

And he isn’t alone in his critiques. Dr. David Kyle Johnson penned a piece in 2012 for Psychology Today titled, “Let’s Bench The Elf on the Shelf,” during which he, too, discussed the potential pitfalls of the children’s tradition.

Johnson, who has also vocally argued against lying about Santa in the past, believes that the “Elf on the Shelf is basically a steroid shot for the Santa Lie.”

“Your children rely on you to give them accurate information about the way the world is, and you should want them to trust and believe what you say,” he wrote. “But finding out that you have been lying to them – and even been playing an elaborate joke on them … has the possibility of significantly eroding their ability to trust you.”

Really!

We used to laugh at and pity characters in movies and books who didn’t believe in Santa and made their children into little Nietzsches. Are Leftist brains that vacant and c rule that would take Santo Claus from children? Is this another form of ridiculous child abuse which the Left is so fond of championing against? Are they so willing to remove the innocent wishes and dreams of childhood.

These Neanderthals should consider this.

Those who no longer wish, no longer dream. And those who lose their dreams lose their hopes. And those who lose hope are easy to control. The freedom to live comes directly from the freedom to dream.

But that’s what the Grinche Left is all about. Restricting ones freedom.

December 20, 2014

The True Story of NORAD’s Santa Tracker and How it Began with a Typo and a Good Sport

Filed under: Uncategorized — Frank Fiore @ 12:23 PM

This Christmas Eve people all over the world will log on to the official Santa Tracker to follow his progress through U.S. military radar. This all started in 1955, with a misprint in a Colorado Springs newspaper and a call to Col. Harry Shoup’s secret hotline at the Continental Air Defense Command, now known as NORAD.

Shoup’s children, Terri Van Keuren, 65, Rick Shoup, 59, and Pam Farrell, 70, recently visited StoryCorps to talk about how the tradition began.

The Santa Tracker tradition started with this Sears ad, which instructed children to call Santa on what turned out to be a secret military hotline. Kids today can call 1-877 HI-NORAD (1-877-446-6723) to talk to NORAD staff about Santa’s exact location.

vankeuren_extra1_custom-1840fd717cabf3ef6d3daab6722b602e86d172c2-s300-c85Terri remembers her dad had two phones on his desk, including a red one. “Only a four-star general at the Pentagon and my dad had the number,” she says.

“This was the ’50s, this was the Cold War, and he would have been the first one to know if there was an attack on the United States,” Rick says.

The red phone rang one day in December 1955, and Shoup answered it, Pam says. “And then there was a small voice that just asked, ‘Is this Santa Claus?’

His children remember Shoup as straight-laced and disciplined, and he was annoyed and upset by the call and thought it was a joke — but then, Terri says, the little voice started crying.

“And Dad realized that it wasn’t a joke,” her sister says. “So he talked to him, ho-ho-ho’d and asked if he had been a good boy and, ‘May I talk to your mother?’ And the mother got on and said, ‘You haven’t seen the paper yet? There’s a phone number to call Santa. It’s in the Sears ad.’ Dad looked it up, and there it was, his red phone number. And they had children calling one after another, so he put a couple of airmen on the phones to act like Santa Claus.”

“The airmen had this big glass board with the United States on it and Canada, and when airplanes would come in they would track them,” Pam says.

“And Christmas Eve of 1955, when Dad walked in, there was a drawing of a sleigh with eight reindeer coming over the North Pole,” Rick says

“Dad said, ‘What is that?’ They say, ‘Colonel, we’re sorry. We were just making a joke. Do you want us to take that down?’ Dad looked at it for a while, and next thing you know, Dad had called the radio station and had said, ‘This is the commander at the Combat Alert Center, and we have an unidentified flying object. Why, it looks like a sleigh.’ Well, the radio stations would call him like every hour and say, ‘Where’s Santa now?’ ” Terri says.

“And later in life he got letters from all over the world, people saying, ‘Thank you, Colonel,’ for having, you know, this sense of humor. And in his 90s, he would carry those letters around with him in a briefcase that had a lock on it like it was top-secret information,” she says. “You know, he was an important guy, but this is the thing he’s known for.”

“Yeah,” Rick says, “it’s probably the thing he was proudest of, too.”

December 19, 2014

Teens Rite of Passage and Proper Decision Making

Filed under: MURRAN — Frank Fiore @ 12:49 PM
Tags: , , , ,

The main theme of my new novel MURRAN is one of a teen’s rite of passage. Trey, the main character in the story, must find his way through difficult decisions – life and death decisions.

Though the decisions that teens must make are not so drastic as those posed to Trey, they do point to how teens are making decisions today – and how much good parenting helps teens make responsible decisions.

The national organization Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) and Liberty Mutual Insurance conduct an annual survey of teenagers in America to identify ways to help teens make better decisions. This year’s Teens Today report relates to how teens handle important transitions in their lives and the impact of those “rites of passage” on their decision making.

About Parenting writes:

The Teens Today report reveals that “high school teens whose parents pay the least attention to significant transition periods (45%) such as puberty, school change, and key birthdays are more likely than teens whose parents pay the most attention (81%) to engage in high risk behaviors, including drinking, drug use, early sexual intercourse, and dangerous driving. They are twice as likely to report daily stress and appear to be twice as likely to report being depressed and bored.”

What are some of the important rites of passage that teens go through and have to make RESPONSIBLE decisions on?

 According to the Teens Today report, these transition points or rites of passage include:

  • Puberty
  • Moving to a New School
  • Birthdays
  • Getting a Drivers License
  • Obtaining a First Car
  • Graduating from High School
  • First Date

The Teens Today report is telling—-a parent being there with their teens at the crossroads of their young lives is critical to their behavioral choices and to their feelings about themselves.

These ‘crossroads’ in a teen’s life, so to speak, would be made less difficult if parents would help them through this rite of passage and the ability to make responsible decisions from them.

December 18, 2014

What Is Our Youth Turning Into?

Filed under: Uncategorized — Frank Fiore @ 11:48 AM
Tags: , ,

Postponing exams because college students are too tired from protesting Ferguson?

Too stressed to take exams because of Eric Garner?

College students ask professors to exempt ‘students of color’ from exams.

Tired? Haven’t these ‘scholars’ ever crammed for finals?

Stressed? Wait until these ‘scholars’ hit the real world.

Exempt students of color because ‘black lives matter’? It doesn’t matter to these ‘future leaders’ that a lack of a proper education – like taking exams – DOES matter for people of color’s future?

It seems to me that there is a systematic process of shielding college students from their biggest goal of the transition from child to adult – taking responsibility – not looking for ways to avoid it.

College should be a rite of passage for these students – one from immature childhood to the responsibilities of adulthood.

If they are not allowed to fail at the comparably small challenges of college, what will happen to them when they inevitably face some truly challenging life situations?

We are doing them a serious disservice by coddling them and denying them the rite of passage into adulthood.

December 17, 2014

University of Stupid

Filed under: Uncategorized — Frank Fiore @ 2:56 PM
Tags:

“Stupid is as stupid does.” That saying of Forrest Gump can be no truer. And our vaulted college students prove his point.

Students at George Washington University (GWU) willingly signed a petition supporting the deportation of one American citizen in exchange for one illegal immigrant.

They are willing to take the opportunity of an American citizen away and give it to an undocumented alien.

Check it out.

« Previous PageNext Page »

The Rubric Theme. Blog at WordPress.com.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,864 other followers