Frank Fiore – Novelist & Screenwriter

January 17, 2015

“Most of the basic material a writer works with is acquired before the age of fifteen”

Filed under: Uncategorized — Frank Fiore @ 9:27 AM

When I read that quote by famous author Willa Cather I wondered if it were true. Then I thought back over my writing experience and realized – she just might be right.

Now, she said ‘acquired material’ and not ‘how to write’ by that age. That comes later as one hones his or her craft. ‘Material’ in the sense of not only genre or subject matter but also one’s experiences as a child and adolescence.

I was born into the Cold War and the ever-present threat of devastating nuclear war. So, it was no surprise that the first story I ever wrote while in elementary school was about a small tin truck owned by a little boy and given to the tin drive in World War Two. That little truck was melted down into a series of weapons – rifles, mortars, and artillery pieces – and finally wound up in the Enola Gay – the B-29 that dropped the first atomic bomb on Japan. When I handed in my little story assignment entitled “I Made History”, my teacher gave me a very odd look.

I’ve been getting that same odd look for my writing ever since.

This was followed in high school by an uncompleted story of Russians invading New York and high school students fighting them off. The theme was very similar to the movie Red Dawn that came out many years later. If I knew of the WGA back then I would have registered the idea and probably made a lot of money.

Let that be a lesson to all you writers. Register your ideas!

I didn’t write again until after the service and was in college. This was a completed SyFy novel in the vein of the Golden Age of Science Fiction Writers. It had an alienation theme where I tapped my earlier years growing up as a nerdy kid.

So, I guess Willa had some pretty good insight.

You go girl!

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