Frank Fiore – Novelist & Screenwriter

January 24, 2010

Famous First Lines Quiz

Filed under: Uncategorized — Frank Fiore @ 3:41 PM

See how many of these famous first lines from literature you can identify.

1.         ‘All children, except one, grow up.’

The Time Machine by H.G. Wells

Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie

A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving

Stuart Little by E.B. White

2.         ‘It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.’

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

Rebecca by Daphne DuMaurier

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Tess of the D. Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy

3.         ‘Christmas won’t be Christmas without any presents,’ grumbled Jo, lying on the rug.’

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

4.         ‘The great fish moved silently through the night water, propelled by short sweeps of its crescent tail.’

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

Jaws by Peter Benchley

Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

The Call of the Wild by Jack London

5.         ‘It was a pleasure to burn.’

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl

The Mosquito Coast by Paul Theroux

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

6.         ‘When Mary Lennox was sent to Misselthwaite Manor to live with her uncle everybody said she was the most disagreeable-looking child ever seen.’

The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackery

The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

7.         ‘Marley was dead, to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that.’

The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

8.         ‘A throng of bearded men, in sad-colored garments and gray, steeple-crowned hats, intermixed with women, some wearing hoods, and others bareheaded, was assembled in front of a wooden edifice, the door of which was heavily timbered with oak…’

Silas Marner by George Eliot

The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

9.         ‘Not so long ago, a monster came to the small town of Castle Rock, Maine.’

The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty

Beloved by Toni Morrison

Cujo by Stephen King

Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

10.       ‘If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you’ll probably want to know is where I was born, and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but…’

Still Life with Woodpecker by Tom Robbins

Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce

Native Son by Richard Wright

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

How’d you do?

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2 Comments »

  1. Social comments and analytics for this post…

    This post was mentioned on Twitter by followthenovel: See how many of these famous first lines from literature you can identify. http://tinyurl.com/y9zkbw6

    Trackback by uberVU - social comments — January 24, 2010 @ 3:48 PM | Reply

  2. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Zinta Aistars, Frank Fiore, Frank Fiore, Frank Fiore, Frank Fiore and others. Frank Fiore said: #Books See how many of these famous first lines from literature you can identify. http://tinyurl.com/y9zkbw6 […]

    Pingback by Tweets that mention Famous First Lines Quiz « Frank Fiore – Novelist & Screenwriter -- Topsy.com — January 25, 2010 @ 4:17 AM | Reply


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